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Questions & Answers about the medical exam

  Will I have to take a medical exam?

  Will my application be rejected if I have a certain disease or disorder?

  If I am pregnant, will I still have to undergo the medical examination?

  Can my dependents undergo the medical examination in another country?

  Will my non-accompanying dependents be required to complete medical examinations?

  Recently I completed medical examinations for my Canadian visitor visa/student authorization/employment authorization. Must I complete additional medical exams for my permanent resident application?

  Do all my family members have to be medically examined by the same doctor?

  Why do my dependants have to be medically examined by a doctor if they are not immigrating to Canada with me?

  Do I need a new medical exam? I was examined for my student authorization at another office abroad.

  I am pregnant and my doctor has advised me that I should not undergo x-rays while pregnant. What should I do? Can I be exempted from the x-ray requirement?

  Can my own doctor perform the medical examination?

  Where can I get a list of Designated Medical Practitioners (DMP) around the world?

  Will I receive a copy of the medical report and the result of the medical examination?

  For how long is the medical examination valid?

  Must everyone in my family have a medical examination?

  Can my own doctor do the medical examination?

  My children are studying abroad and cannot return home for their immigration medical examination for another six months. I do not want to delay my application. What should I do?

  I do not understand "excessive demand" or whether my ailment would place an excessive demand on Canada's health or social services. Can you tell me more?

  Can the doctor advise me regarding my application?

  What happens if my application is refused?

Q: Will I have to take a medical exam?
A: All prospective immigrants to Canada are required to undergo medical examinations. These examinations are intended to detect any conditions which may affect the health of the Canadian public, or which may result in excessive demands being placed upon the Canadian health care system. The medical examination includes a standard physical examination, blood tests, urine tests, and X-Rays.

Q: Will my application be rejected if I have a certain disease or disorder?
A: Each medical case is analyzed individually, taking into account your full medical history. If the disease or disorder poses health risks to Canadians or places excessive demands on the Canadian health care system, it may result in medical inadmissibility .

Q: If I am pregnant, will I still have to undergo the medical examination?
A: For the safety of the fetus, X-rays are not taken of pregnant applicants until after delivery of the baby. After the birth, the mother and infant will undergo medical examinations.
Q: Can my dependents undergo the medical examination in another country?
A: The examination is given around the world by designated medical practitioners. Regardless of the visa office to which the application was submitted, the services of any such practitioner may be used.

Q: Will my non-accompanying dependents be required to complete medical examinations?
A: Non-accompanying dependents are required to undergo medical examinations, as are accompanying dependents. If a non-accompanying dependent is unwilling to undergo a medical examination, it may be possible to have the individual exempted. However, such non-accompanying dependents will not be eligible for subsequent sponsorship as members of the Family Class.

Q: Recently I completed medical examinations for my Canadian visitor visa/student authorization/employment authorization. Must I complete additional medical exams for my permanent resident application?
A: If medical examinations were taken less than one year before you applied for permanent residence and you were positively assessed as M1 or M2, additional medical examinations may not be required.
Q: Do all my family members have to be medically examined by the same doctor?
A: Whenever possible, all family members should be examined by the same doctor. If this is not possible, your family members may be examined by another doctor whose name appears on our list of designated medical practitioners (DMP). If you do not have the DMP list for a certain country, please send a fax or letter to the Consulate.

Q: Why do my dependants have to be medically examined by a doctor if they are not immigrating to Canada with me?
A: Your spouse and all your dependant children MUST be medically examined regardless of whether they are accompanying you to Canada. You may be eligible to sponsor non-accompanying dependants for permanent residence once you are landed in Canada. It must be determined whether or not these dependants are medically admissible to Canada. You and your immediate family members must all be in good health in order to be granted Permanent Residence in Canada.

Q: Do I need a new medical exam? I was examined for my student authorization at another office abroad.
A: The results of a medical examination are only valid for one year. If you were recently (within the last 4-6 months) examined for a student authorization, you may not require another medical exam. If this is the case, please send us a fax or letter giving the medical exam details, (i.e., where, when and the name of the doctor), and we will respond within four weeks.
Q: I am pregnant and my doctor has advised me that I should not undergo x-rays while pregnant. What should I do? Can I be exempted from the x-ray requirement?
A: Many women prefer not to undergo x-rays while pregnant. Our office respects this preference, however, you are not exempt from this requirement. Once the baby is born, please go to the doctor and have the x-ray portion of the medical exam completed. Your file will remain active until after you have given birth. Remember to inform the Consulate of the birth of your baby, and provide a copy of the baby's birth certificate.

Q: Can my own doctor perform the medical examination?
A: No. You must be examined by a doctor on Canada's list of Designated Medical Practitioners (DMP). However, if you live more than 200 kilometres from a DMP, please notify our office by fax or mail explaining the situation and indicate the distance between your home and the closest doctor on the DMP list. Please also include your full address, day time phone number and the name and complete address of the doctor you wish to visit and we will respond. In certain cases, you will be allowed to visit another doctor. You should not be examined by a doctor who is not on the DMP list unless you have written permission from our office.
Q: Where can I get a list of Designated Medical Practitioners (DMP) around the world?
A: This information is available on the Internet at: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/info/medical.html This is the main Citizenship and Immigration web site. After selecting either French or English, click on the "Quick Find" field and select Designated Medical Practitioners from the list. You can also request the list of doctors directly from the Consulate by sending a fax or letter. Please indicate in your letter/fax which country list you need. The Consulate will not send you the entire world list.

Q: Will I receive a copy of the medical report and the result of the medical examination?
A: All medical reports and X-rays for the Immigration Medical Examination become the property of the Canadian Immigration Medical Authorities and cannot be returned to the applicant. The designated physician will not advise you of the results of the medical. The final decision on whether or not a medical is acceptable is determined by the visa office and not the designated physician. If your medical does not meet immigration requirements, the visa office will inform you by letter.

Q: For how long is the medical examination valid?
A: The medical examination is valid for 12 months from the date of the first medical examination or test. If your visa is not processed in this time, you must take another complete examination.
Q: Must everyone in my family have a medical examination?
A: Yes.

Q: Can my own doctor do the medical examination?
A: No. The examination must be done by a doctor on Canada's list of Designated Medical Physicians.

Q: My children are studying abroad and cannot return home for their immigration medical examination for another six months. I do not want to delay my application. What should I do?
A: Whenever possible, all family members must be examined by the same designated physician. If this is impossible, arrange your medical with the designated physician and advise him/her that your dependents are abroad and will arrange to have their medical exams done by a designated physician closer to them. Then forward a copy of the Medical Report Form to each dependent with the addresses of their nearest designated physicians. This list of physicians may be obtained from the Visa Office. Ensure that the box titled "Name of Head of Family" in the Medical Report Form contains your name. Your dependents should then arrange to have their examinations. They should tell the designated physician to forward the completed medical report to the same Canadian medical office that received your report. Your dependant's medical will be matched with your file as the Medical Report Form will have your name written in the box titled "Name of Head of Family". NOTE: Medical instructions will normally be sent to you after you submit your application to the Visa Office.
Q: I do not understand "excessive demand" or whether my ailment would place an excessive demand on Canada's health or social services. Can you tell me more?
A: The factors considered during the medical assessment include whether or not hospitalization or medical, social or institutional care are required and whether potential employability or productivity could be affected. For example, a person with a serious disease or psychiatric disorder requiring ongoing care or hospitalization may be inadmissible because their requirements would place "excessive demand" on the health-care system. Individuals with developmental delay or congenital disorders who require special education or training to lead an independent life may also be inadmissible. Other conditions which could place a significant financial burden on Canada's health or social services would also render an applicant medically inadmissible.

Q: Can the doctor advise me regarding my application?
A: No. The doctor is only responsible for conducting a medical examination in accordance with Canada's immigration requirements. The designated physician cannot provide any advice on the immigration selection system.

Q: What happens if my application is refused?
A: If your application is refused, the visa office will inform you and your sponsor in writing. Your sponsor may appeal the decision to the Immigration and Refugee Board. It is important, therefore, that we always have your sponsor's latest address.

 

 
 
   

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